Tag Archive network

Byadmin

Marketing – It’s a Dirty Word

I still encounter those who see marketing as at best a necessary evil and at worst a practice of smoke and mirrors with no substance.

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This unwarranted prejudice is borne out of a lack of understanding of the core principles of marketing.  Sceptics who poke sticks at marketers often suggest that the acquiring of customers is not difficult.  Winning new business is not connected to marketing activity.  They believe that by producing a quality product or service customers will return and promote to others.  That method of gaining customers can often be effective but the marketing element should already be interwoven with production and customer experience and not simply be seen as a blunt instrument of advertising or PR before or after the fact.  Ironically sceptics often employ marketing techniques, unaware of their natural ability to develop the business.  MD’s don’t always connect their activity to marketing which they see as a separate collection of basic promotional actions.

If you were to survey 100 non marketers and ask them for a definition of marketing the chances are over 50% would reference advertising within their response.  The truth is marketing, certainly for me is “The Business of Business” a little more than creating and placing an advert.  To be an effective marketer you must understand all you can about your customers, the financial model that produces the product, where the margins kick in, the mechanisms involved in delivering the product and the experience of customers once purchased.  The entire scope of the company, its infrastructure, inner workings and technical elements must be understood to contextualise a successful approach to develop the brand and thereby grow the business.

All too often when recruiting or appointing a marketing resource business owners go into the process with a narrow pre-determined idea of what the person will add to the mix.  They focus on PR or advertising.  They might also worry about the need for a better online presence rather than consider an opportunity to involve the marketer in helping with business planning and setting a strategy.

Typical Marketing Professionals Skill Set

  • Account Management
  • Administration
  • Advertising
  • Analytical
  • Brand Marketing & Management
  • Business Development
  • Client Relationship/ Customer Care
  • Collaboration
  • Communication
  • Competitive Analysis
  • Content Marketing
  • Contract Negotiation
  • CRM/ Database Management
  • Creative
  • Direct Marketing
  • Displays
  • Event Planning
  • E-mail marketing
  • Financial
  • Interpersonal
  • Leadership
  • List Management
  • Market Analysis & Research
  • Market Strategy
  • Merchandising
  • Mobile Marketing
  • Order Processing
  • Planning & Project Management
  • PPC
  • Presentations
  • Product Research
  • Problem Resolution
  • Product Management
  • Product Promotion
  • Professional
  • Public Relations
  • Purchasing Inventory
  • Quality Control
  • Reporting
  • Sales Tracking
  • SEO
  • Social Media
  • Supplier Management
  • Teaching/ Training
  • Team Player
  • Time Management
  • Troubleshooting

An added challenge for many is the “hobby” marketer boss who believes they can play “the marketing game”.  We all consume so many marketing messages each day it’s not surprising that a boss or client might suggest they have the answer to a new advertising campaign, website or sponsorship deal.  Don’t for one minute think I’m against business owners or bosses getting engaged with the marketing activity.  I’ve spent far too long in my career trying to encourage such interest to fight it; but it can be difficult for junior, less experienced marketers to put a counter view forward when the ultimate decision maker insists on having their way.

Where experienced and effective marketers set themselves apart is in their ability to distinguish “good ideas” from the ego driven project.  They need an ability to swiftly reflect and analyse any newly presented opportunity, establish the potential impact and make recommendations in plain jargon free English.  That particular skill can save organisations a large chunk of their marketing budget.

A very good example of the scale of the challenge for today’s marketer is their need to stay on top of the terabytes of information related to digital marketing.  Without necessarily being an expert the modern marketer must understand the principles of SEO, (search engine optimisation) PPC (pay per click advertising) Social Media, Mobile Technologies, Online Advertising and CRM (Customer Relationship Management).  Interpreting Google Analytics and having the confidence to reject or accept digital agency proposals are also essential attributes of those holding the responsibility for marketing in any organisation.

Yes it’s complicated out there but life is these days.  We can either keep up or give in and outsource management to the wave upon wave of niche agency suppliers promising to deliver success.  Without the confidence borne out of our own knowledge of specific marketing processes we’re left with fingers crossed just hoping that the agency knows what they’re doing with their sizeable budget.  Personally I don’t see it as an option.  We owe it to ourselves, clients and employers to provide the very best level of expertise and professionalism and demonstrate that more than ever we have the knowledge and the spark to drive businesses forward.

Far from being a dirty word marketing is the discipline that business owners need to embrace wholeheartedly.  They need to seek out the very best qualified practitioners to work with, provide resource and trust them to deliver.  David Laud – FCIM Chartered Marketer, consultant.

Byadmin

Think You’re a Thought Leader? Test that belief with 12 tips to thought leadership

“Thought Leadership” now there’s a two word phrase that has emerged through the social channels in the past couple of years. As with any trendy term the bandwagon soon becomes full and chased by those who think they know the answers but often started after the opportunity well before they’d studied the direction in which they should be travelling.

Thought Leader

Thought Leader

Personally I’m not a fan of such glib phrases mostly because of their all too often over use in the hands of those who think using it will magically propel them into the top echelons of that particular sphere.

Before my cynicism takes hold I would like to make a few positive observations about the concept of thought leadership and how it can be a powerful force for good, in the appropriate hands at the right time and with considered execution.

Let’s start by reflecting on what makes a thought leader. It’s not necessarily a business owner nor entrepreneur but someone who has a depth of knowledge and clearly articulated view on a specific topic. The best thought leaders have a passion for their chosen subject of interest and that enthusiasm carries through in the variety of channels they chose to convey their message.

What it’s not – it’s not a sales platform to funnel in a pitch for a particular product, service or concept that offers immediate financial return for the communicator. That is out and out selling and will be spotted from some distance by your audience of network members.

What it should be – open, honest and thought provoking communication that adds to the knowledge and understanding of your target audience. Of course there will be an unspoken understanding within your network that behind this altruistic sharing of intelligent analysis and opinion lies a commercial objective.

How do you capitalise by giving your best ideas away for free? – No one is suggesting that all of your best thinking needs to be shared openly however it’s a very cluttered and noisy world and the challenge is in how you may find a voice for yourself, colleagues and your business by positioning them as leaders in a particular field. The danger of holding back on a particular subject may leave a door open for a competitor to establish their viewpoint and be perceived as the new “go to” source of information.

Do you need to be an expert in all areas? – Of course you’re setting yourself up for a fall if you’re a self-proclaimed “Guru” and for me that’s the biggest turn off. The phrase is “Empty vessels make the most sound” and unfortunately there are no shortage of those. What can be refreshingly appealing to an audience is an industry commentator who admits that they don’t know it all. That openness and honesty builds trust with a network and an affinity that you won’t see from those who are clearly making it up as they go along.

How can this apply to my business? Whichever area you work in – legal, IT, manufacturing, organic farming, charity, education or public sector there are individuals who will be looking for answers, original thinking and leadership. Social networking platforms enable everyone with an internet connection and a suitable device to link to millions of data sources each day. Creating a space for you or your organisation by positioning it as a lead in the chosen specialist area will add value to the brand and over time ideally lead to an increase in the volume and quality of enquiries.

Is it all about the broadcast? What you say is of course very important but what you do is equally telling. If you receive a re-tweet or a G+ or comment it should always be offered the courtesy of a response. If you see someone else posting very good content, useful links or other material supportive of your sector don’t resist the opportunity to praise the contributor, even if it may be a competitor – it’s about positioning and taking a “big picture” view rather than scrapping things out in the trenches.

What should the message be? True thought leadership is sharp in focus and unique in its perspective. Not borrowed or paraphrased from others. It should follow a consistent line. If customer service in retail is your particular line of interest the messages conveyed need to retain a common theme leaving the audience in no doubt of your view and suggested course of action. That message should deliver insight and information that leaves the reader or viewer feeling that they have gained from the experience. Investing time in absorbing data online is very popular but won’t pay off for you if the content falls short or leaves the reader frustrated.

Who should you be directing your message to? This might sound obvious but it’s surprising how many, who are active on social networking sites, persist with an obsession with the numbers. How many you have in a network will play a minor role in your success especially if the network is largely made up of competitors, friends or random individuals who will add no value to your business. The audience needs to gain real value from the knowledge imparted and for an opportunity to impress and create impact an in depth understanding is essential. A detailed awareness of your network, their jobs, problems, aspirations and interests will help shape the message and provide a tailored communication that has far greater prospect of engagement.

Developing as a thought leader. Sitting back and expecting inspiration to flow will work in the short term, if you’re lucky, but not in the longer term. As with any other industry expert you can’t afford to sit still and ignore the developments that are happening all around you. Actively seek out available information from those who are influential and recognised sources, subscribe to trade press e-mail alerts, twitter accounts, join sector specific associations, work groups on LinkedIn, attend conferences and build a continually growing bank of information. From this source you can articulate your view and place your own organisation at the centre of that conversation.

What makes a good thought leader? Malcolm Gladwell uses the term Maven in his excellent book Tipping Point (recommended reading) and the (i)Wiki definition really puts it very well.
(i) A maven (also mavin) is a trusted expert in a particular field, who seeks to pass knowledge on to others. The word maven comes from Hebrew, via Yiddish and means one who understands, based on an accumulation of knowledge.
Those whom I would site as leading Mavens or thought leaders of note include, technology futurist and social media strategist Guy Kawasaki @GuyKawasaki, Virgin entrepreneur Richard Branson @RichardBranson, and leading business strategists Rosabeth Kanter @RosabethKanter and Stephen Covey.

How do I start? A suggestion would be to think long and hard about the message you wish to convey, how your business wants to be positioned and who within the organisation could be sufficiently qualified to take the role of a thought leader. You may need to face the reality that you don’t have that particular skill but look to recruit for it. As you’ll fully appreciate it’s not a given that everyone can be a thought leader but if you have a passion for your business, access to strong communication skills and a connected network you can begin to build a presence and see where that journey takes you. Above all have a plan and be consistent.

Each industry or sector will have its own leading lights but that doesn’t preclude you from learning from their approach and finding your own voice and space to communicate.

If you would like further help with the development of a “thought leader” strategy in your organisation or have your own particular view we would be delighted to hear from you.

David Laud – Managing Partner i2i Business Solutions LLP
follow me on twitter @davidlaud

Byadmin

How Many Social Media “Experts” Does It Take To Turn On A Lightbulb?

We’re all under pressure for one reason or another. This ever developing technology has not delivered its promise of greater leisure time and standards of living; well not for most of us anyway. Instead we’re expected to task like a multi armed, dextrous ninja; responding to e-mails, calls, texts, skype and of course schedule in good old fashioned face to face interaction.

No surprise then that I’m often met with a more than cynical sneer when its suggested that a business owner take some of that valuable time and engage in or make more resource available to develop their social media presence.

I get it. I truly do understand that the thought of “tweeting” baffles and bewilders, facebook’s not for everyone and Linkedin, whilst appearing more suited to the business professional; is not easy to see how you benefit.

Too many evangelical so called social media “experts” have fallen in love with the various platforms and the ego trip of growing followers, connections and responses and forgotten that for most they’re not seen as essential in the battle to grow their company. There’s an awareness of the staggering demographic statistics but not how they can be used to benefit a business.

Many of my clients are very sharp individuals who’ve typically built successful businesses by meeting the needs of a targeted customer base. They’ve kept a step ahead of the competition, invested in their company and know their business inside out.

They also have no fear in challenging the call to join the social media bandwagon. They didn’t succeed by following a flock but they’re curious enough to ask the direct questions everyone should pose to a new medium.

How does it work? What are the benefits? What are the costs? Who needs to be involved? Where are the opportunities? And my favourite which covers all the aforementioned, Why should we do it?

If practical answers to these key questions are not forthcoming it’s unlikely the business owners will engage, and who would blame them?

Each business is unique and no one solution can possibly “fit all” which is why my advice is qualified by researching the specific sector, understanding the issues and the behaviours of customer groups and industry influencers.

We’ve now experienced over ten years of social media activity, it continues to move very rapidly yet within this timeframe you can find a multitude of examples where companies have positivley engaged with their customers. These examples are quantifiable, real and very often prove to be the “lightbulb moment” for MD’s VP’s CEO’s Directors and Partners especially if it’s a business operating in the same sector if not a direct competitor.

From Insurance and Aflac running an XFactor styled voice talent competition to Airlines and KLM’s “meet and seat” facebook campaign.

Of course it’s not just big businesses that can afford to make the most of social media and most towns, sectors and networks have their own shining examples of “best practice”.

We strongly believe in encouraging ownership and participation “in house” to develop the understanding, not outsourcing social media activity to third parties.

As professional marketers our objective should be to build confidence for our clients and employers through practical planning, suitable resourcing and measurement; all prepared as a specific project helping to make best use of everyone’s time. Social media’s a serious business development tool but we should make sure we factor in time for some fun too.

If you’d like more information or arrange an initial consultation please drop me a line david.laud@i2isolutions.co.uk

David Laud – i2i Business Solutions LLP

David Laud
Partner
i2i Business Solutions LLP

Byadmin

Stop Wasting Time and Start Acting Like a Child

When most of my fellow Generation X’s first set out on their careers I doubt many would have guessed accurately how their lives would pan out or how challenging it would be to be a success in their chosen field.

I wasn’t sure what I wanted to be but looking back the signs were there at a very early age. Creating my own football cards using imaginary players and actually selling them, 2p each. Re-selling my fathers confectionary ingredients in sample bags during school break times and making a few pounds from a card club that hid within the legitimate but rather more boring chess club.

After a few failed attempts in other areas, insurance and travel I discovered marketing and hey presto I’m now a marketer, one of the chartered variety actually I have a certificate that says so.

But even though my career path has seemed relatively linear; school boy salesman, marketing exec, sales manager, marketing manager, head of marketing etc.. I can assure you it’s been far from straightforward.

I’m not unusual in this reflection of my work life. Whether soldier, scientist, safe cracker or solicitor; dealing with day to day matters to stay one step ahead has become increasingly challenging.

But why is this and what of the future? Part of the issue is time or rather a lack of it. We try and achieve too much and have over exaggerated expectations of what we can do in a day. Technology is a big part to play in that. E-mail, text, tweet and facebook post make you readily accessible to a population who are only too ready to take your time.

Time moving faster as we get older is of course a perception rather than a reality but it feels very real. This is because we have lost our sense of wonder. Two years in the life of a toddler can seem as long as the average retirement, almost twenty years because a two year old is seeing most things for the first time. Everything is new, exciting, challenging, rewarding, painful, funny and days stretch on filled with these experiences.

By the time we come to retire we’ve seen it, done it, bought the XXL T shirt and possibly the XX video. Little can shock, inspire, challenge or excite us. But if we want to see time slow down we should take a different mental attitude. Be prepared to see the wonder again in simple pleasures, no not necessarily hug your nearest conifer but try and recapture that childlike innocence and strip away the cynicism and explore.

That is of course a tough ask for many. By the time we hit our 30’s 40’s and certainly 50’s we’re pretty much set in our ways, in a groove that we’ve designed for ourselves. It’s comfortable, safe and secure. Change is threatening and offers a chance to fail which we have become programmed to resist at all costs.

As young children we didn’t understand the concept of time – no deadlines, appointments, 9 to 5 mentality – and we can’t now un think that conditioning but we can try and recapture the simplicity of life and observe some of the detail that can go whizzing past us on a busy day.

It starts with removing the self imposed and pestering time wasters that are often linked to the technology we use.

I’ve revisited an old time management book, put in place a few simple but very effective rules and started to appreciate how much time is truly wasted in any given day. Now I’m winning back time previously flushed away amongst groaning e-mail inboxes and must respond voicemails.

Taking back control of your working day is just the first step. What you do with that extra precious resource of time is the next.

Time to clock off, it’s time for play … 🙂

David Laud – david.laud@i2isolutions.co.uk

Byadmin

Take the Screen Test to See if You’re Addicted to Apps

Does this sound familiar? You settle down to relax after a days work, the TV is as usual on and turning out the usual “reality” fest of low grade entertainment. Out of courtesy you check what your partner/family/ friends would prefer to watch, hoping you can for once agree but… when you look around the room you notice all fellow inhabitants are glued to the screen. No not the 40 inch flat screen in the corner but the 2.5 inch by 3 inch version held in the hand.

Are we becoming obsessed by our smartphones? You might think so if you, like me, play dodge the teenager on the high street as they walk along in a somnambulistic style, hypnotised by their device unable to look up and see who they’re about to collide with.

But is it the device or something else that’s causing this epidemic? The smartphones provide a portal to a new and exciting world but the true cause of our preoccupation are the various applications that live on these instruments.

Just before you think I’m taking the high ground I need to confess to my own weaknesses. Yes, I too have an addiction to the touch screen world. For me it started with my first iphone and has developed as I’ve been able to run my world through it. Well, perhaps more accurately it runs me.

I can break the problem down to 4 main areas of activity that can quickly become an addictive.

1. Checking e-mail
2. Checking text messages (it’s quite worrying how many drivers I see texting while driving!)
3. Checking social media sites for likes, mentions and comments
4. Games

Yes I tend to check my e-mail too often which is not helped by the multiple accounts and spam. There have also been a couple of recent examples of sudden onset addiction brought about by a newly downloaded app.

A problem with my broadband connection led to me downloading the “speedtest” app. Let’s just say I become rather too obsessed with download and upload speeds for a couple of weeks.

The other time thief is the analytical tools I have to measure social media activity. Yes I have too many sites but then its my job to keep abreast of these platforms. But my love/hate relationship with Klout is unhealthy and it’s time for the “it’s me not you, I need some time to work things out” break up conversation.

I do use a very large number of social media sites but I don’t think I’m unusual in the time I spend with my smartphone. Not unusual by the benchmark of the average user but that’s because we’ve become used to having our devices with us constantly.

It can’t be good for us to become obsessed and addicted to anything despite the attraction and apparent benefits of the developing technology. How much time can we fritter away on Angry Birds, Temple Run, Instagram (perfecting the image through photo apps), Linkedin group exchanges, Facebook babble, Tweets and RT’s, celebrity face matching…you get the idea.

But perhaps we should test our resolve and see how much of a problem we have. Here’s the “Screen Test” challenge. Pick one day this week and have 24 hours without access to your phone, tablet or smart device.

I did this recently and will now be making a habit of it as that day proved to be one of my most productive for quite some time.

Things you can do….

1. Catch up with industry/ local news by reading magazines
2. Plan ahead – your forthcoming week, month, year
3. Get creative and think of how you might make better use of your time and when you do have access to the device how you can take back control.
4. Arrange to meet that contact who you’ve been meaning to catch up with for months.

The technology is great but it’s still only a tool to be used effectively and not something that should dominate our lives. Just take the “Screen Test” and let me know how it was for you.

David Laud

Byadmin

Virtual vs Reality – the role of offline marketing

 

Perhaps it’s the natural born geek in me connected to the genuine interest in new marketing mediums but I’ve blogged a lot about online activity, time to consider matters offline.

What do I mean by “offline”? Well literally anything that’s not computer or even phone related, that’s my definition. Others are more specific stating online is anything internet based but with sms and app technologies I think we need to broaden that to include smartphone marketing.

Twitter, Linkedin et al are awash with marketing experts pushing particular top ten ways to…, things to avoid, the must have software all related to developing online business.  True, there is a massive market out there online but we shouldn’t become too focused on this channel of activity.

Offline online crossovers do occur of course with articles and press stories appearing in online news and traditional paper based periodicals but in the most part there is a distinction.

So what offline activity should we be looking at if we’ve spent a little too long screen staring?

Events – Event based marketing that brings targets to you. Offering your guests an opportunity to experience something interesting and worthwhile that may help them in either their professional or personal life can be an ideal way to raise your brand profile.

Meetings – the opportunity to spend time face to face with a prospect customer is still one of the best methods of generating new business.  With finances and time often in short supply it can be hard to persuade a prospective buyer to open their door.  Preparation and an appropriate approach to each prospect is the key.  These days the “hard sell” won’t get you very far customers are far too aware of the signs so taking a consultative problem solving approach can be far more effective.

TV and Radio – whilst times have been tough for broadcast media many stations have adapted to offer attractive and not always “break the marketing bank”, methods of advertising. Sponsorship of certain regular features can be a very good entry into TV or radio but it isn’t for all businesses and can still be expensive if not focused or creatively weak.  This medium can still dazzle many business owners who fall in love with the idea of broadcasting their brand in this way.

Press Adverts – again publishers have been struggling to attract advertising revenues so be prepared to bargain hard if it’s a route you’re considering.  As with TV and radio it can be expensive if you dip in and out rather than construct a campaign of reasonable duration unless of course you have a specific promotion and time limited call to action event.  We still like to read and take in information on good old papyrus rather as well as pc although figures on readership are down generally certain local newspapers and magazines have bucked the trend.

Direct Marketing – traditional mailshots are declining.  This is a result of the increase in e-mail marketing as more of us are online and the costs compared to design, print and distribution of leaflets or flyers. As with newsprint – a well designed and targeted mail campaign can still be effective. Personally I’m a big fan of a well drafted letter but many households have signed up to the mail preference service (mps) which actively prevents you targeting them for such activity.  Taking the message to areas where your target market congregates eg a shopping centre, may be one way to overcome the compliance issue but again the creative execution would need to be one that makes an impact.

Not an exhaustive list but some examples of the offline activity that has worked for years and can and does still work for many businesses b2b or b2c global corporation or sole trader.

Volvo V40 Forums
Peugeot 208 Forums
Ford B Max Forums
Skoda Rapid Forums

The decision to buy a product or service can be a complex one based upon a range of influences.  Often it is the human interplay and physical connection that helps the customer to finally decide but subliminal supporting references gained from marketing in a variety of mediums will always help.

Online activity certainly supports the cause but it’s the traditional routes with a fresh “twist” that can help to make your business stand clear of the competition.

If you have any examples of effective offline activity we’d love to hear from you.

David Laud – Chartered Marketer

David.laud@i2isolutions.co.uk

 

Byadmin

Social Media – Are You Feeling the Love?

Are You Feeling the Love of Social Media?

You’ve followed the advice, created the accounts, sent out the messages, uploaded the links, shared photos and pointed followers and friends to your blog and even taken the time to comment regularly on topical business matters on Linkedin.

So why isn’t it working?  Why doesn’t anyone retweet you, or comment on your blog and like your updates?  It’s an experience shared by colleagues and you’re fast coming to the conclusion that social media is just yet another overhyped fad that will soon wither on the marketing vine.

OK, I hear the frustration and to be frank it’s not an uncommon situation. I often meet with business owners who have struggled to justify time and resource on developing a social media presence and in desperation and a last throw of the dice seek to hand the responsibility completely over to a third party………STOP! Don’t do it.

I appreciate that there is a nice little industry being created for those who can operate social media accounts for others and whilst I’m all for free enterprise it’s not really the point of social media, having someone else talk your talk. Above all social media is about making “real” connections not just making a noise.

But where does that leave the business?  Technically following the correct course of action but just not finding any benefit let alone an audience.

Presented with this problem I prescribe the following;

  1. Audit your social media accounts by asking a few key questions
    1. Who are you connected to?
    2. Who is active within your networks?
    3. What messages are being broadcast?

The building of a network that offers you a rich source of quality content to which you can participate is always a good start.  It may be that those who you are connected to are themselves not very active.  So unwittingly you’ve created a network that as like a party where you’ve invited all the local agoraphobics, it’s not that they don’t like you it’s just that they are struggling to connect too. 

  1. Take a good look at the messages you’re broadcasting and the objectives you have within the business.  It can often be a case that you’re either trying too hard or not hard enough.  As a rule of thumb and to balance the interactions on a platform such as Twitter I recommend 1 business tweet in every 6.  That can include 2 retweets, a reply to someone else’s comment and a couple of general items on the news or points of interest.  Then you can introduce something that relates to your business objective.  Don’t however “oversell”. Social media users are not usually very responsive to the hard sell; actually I’m not sure many of us are in any medium. 
  2. Consider taking a lateral approach.  Now this may well be where your creative agency or consultant can earn their corn. Finding a point of interest that can generate response to your content but not directly “selling” is a good way to build trust and further connections. 

You want an example?  Of course you do….here’s 3

UStechnology company Best Buy introduced a new service for their customers who used twitter.  They created a “Twelpforce” which included staff across all stores who were able to log in and assist customers by responding rapidly to their tech related queries via twitter.  It works like a dream.  Whilst not selling product directly it has had a very positive impact on the brand and has resulted in increased sales.

I can’t claim credit for the genius idea of the “Twelpforce”  but I have initiated a couple of simple ideas, a seasonal photo competition using a TV weather presenter as a judge which has created significant increase in the company brand and awareness on social media sites.  The competition is promoted on Facebook, Flickr, Twitter, LinkedIn.

My most recent idea uses Valentines Day and the offer of a free card and personal message.  This has just launched but has already created significant interest through Facebook where we have created a specific advert and twitter where positive feedback has already been noted.

See here for more information: http://www.samuelphillips.co.uk/news.asp?NewsID=61

As you’ll see from the above examples the idea doesn’t need to have an obvious link to your business.  The key is to make connections, build trust, have fun and let your network realise that you’d be a good organisation to do business with.

If you’ve got an example of your own let’s hear about it.

If you would like the Valentine Card just e-mail me at david.laud@i2isolutions or text “Law of Love” to 82010

Feeling the love yet?  😉

 David Laud